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In The News

May 16, 2018 In The News
During Teacher Appreciation Week, Rep. Anthony Brown (D-Md.) and 35 cosponsors put forth the Educators Expense Deduction Modernization Act, which would index the educator tax deduction to inflation and increase it from $250 to $500.
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May 15, 2018 In The News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Ninety-four percent of U.S. public school teachers spend their own money on classroom supplies without reimbursement, according to a Department of Education survey on Tuesday that follows protests by educators who are asking for more pay and funding.

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May 15, 2018 In The News
Pencils, pens, crayons, construction paper, T-shirts, snacks and, sometimes, a pair of shoes: The costs add up for public school teachers who reach into their own pockets for classroom supplies, ensuring their students have the necessities of learning. Nearly all teachers are footing the bill for classroom supplies, an Education Department report found, and teachers in high-poverty schools spend more than those in affluent schools.
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May 14, 2018 In The News
Congressman Anthony G. Brown (D-MD) introduced legislation last week that would increase the current deduction available to educators from $250 to $500.
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May 11, 2018 In The News
THE TOPLINE: The House Armed Services Committee early Thursday morning easily passed its $716 billion defense policy bill for fiscal 2019. The committee's version of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) passed, 60-1, after more than 14 hours of debate. It now moves to the full House for a vote later this month.
May 10, 2018 In The News
CAPITOL HILL: He had to fight for it, but a stripped-down version of House Armed Services chair Mac Thornberry’s proposal to slash a major component of the Pentagon’s civilian bureaucracy survived the first debate over the 2019 defense budget. The charge to take Thornberry’s cuts to the Fourth Estate was led in part by Democratic Rep. Anthony Brown, who sponsored a series of amendments to save big chunks of the back office and support services that Thornberry was targeting. While most of Brown’s attempts failed, Thornberry gave in to criticism over his call to eliminate the Defense Information Systems Agency and the Washington Headquarters Service, instead deciding to leave any such cuts up to the Pentagon’s chief management officer.
May 10, 2018 In The News
ABOUT LAST NIGHT — HASC APPROVES NDAA: The House Armed Services Committee voted 60 to 1 to advance its version of the fiscal 2019 National Defense Authorization Act to the full House. As in previous years, the lone vote against the bill came from Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii). Rep. Walter Jones (R-N.C.), who didn't attend the markup after winning a primary Tuesday, was the only HASC member who didn't vote.
May 10, 2018 In The News
An effort to slash the Pentagon’s so-called fourth-estate, back-office agencies was weakened but not slain Wednesday at the House Armed Services Committee’s markup of its version of the annual defense policy bill. The panel voted to overrule its own chairman, Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, to protect the Defense Department’s Test Resource Management Center, which oversees weapons testing and evaluation.
May 10, 2018 In The News
A House committee approved the highest military pay raise in nearly a decade, boosts to troop levels across all services and funding for new weapons and equipment as part of a marathon hearing on the next defense policy plan. After more than 14 hours of debate, the House Armed Services Committee approved the massive legislation in a nearly unanimous vote of 60-1.The plan still marks an early stage of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, or NDAA, which will be debated numerous times again before final approval.
May 10, 2018 In The News
The House Armed Services Committee conducted its annual slog through hundreds of amendments to come up with a bipartisan National Defense Authorization Act starting in the morning of May 9 and continuing past midnight. After 14 hours of debate, the committee reported the $716 billion bill, including 248 amendments, favorably on a 60-1 vote. Hawaii Democrat Tulsi Gabbard was the lone holdout. On the IT front, Rep. Anthony Brown (D-Md.) looked to counter the committee chairman's proposal to trim the Pentagon's "fourth estate" -- the defense agencies that provide back office support and services.

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